Do my indoor cats need booster vaccinations and flea and worm treatments?

Discussion in 'Cat Health and Nutrition' started by flossy14, Dec 16, 2008.


  1. flossy14

    flossy14 PetForums Newbie

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    Can anyone help please? I have two indoor 18 month year old sister cats, they were spayed in Feb this year. The vet will always advise that they have expensive yearly vaccinations and flea and worm treatments too. I live in a first floor flat and the cats only go outside in their cat box to visit the vet once a year! I have no idea what is really best/necessary, and would never put their health at risk, but how do I know what to do? Some friends have told me these are an unnecessary cost as the cats never come into contact with anything outside my home, and they are at no risk of these health issues. Can anyone offer some advise please?:confused5:
     
  2. Siamese Kelly

    Siamese Kelly PetForums VIP

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    I would say yes but it's usually boosters and for the flea and worming treatment too just for peace of mind as they can be brought in by any visitors Flossy:)
     
  3. Rio

    Rio PetForums Junior

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    Yes, definitely. Perhaps not quite so regularly but you should worm them still at the least twice a year - perhaps you could do the flea treatment just every quarter.:)
     
  4. Katie&Cody

    Katie&Cody PetForums VIP

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    I personally would see if you get them done less often - best to check with the vet.
    I would think they would still need them to keep them protected and healthy regardless of if they go outside or not....
    Best to check with the vet??
    Good Luck and keep us informed
    xXx
     
  5. rottiesloveragdolls

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    Yes they still need their yearly booster even if they dont go out, some viruses are air born and yep you should still worm and flea them dont forget fleas can jump so when doors are open you dont know if their jumping in from outside :eek: best to be safe than sorry :)
     
  6. Leah100

    Leah100 PetForums Senior

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    Agree with the above, I know of indoor cats that have still caught airborne viruses. Boosters do not guarantee that your cat will never catch a virus, but they do give your cats a much better chance of fighting it off and only having a 'light' case rather than being seriously ill.
     
  7. flossy14

    flossy14 PetForums Newbie

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    Many thanks everyone, thats made things alot clearer. I am off the the vet today for their boosters, and will do the other treatments less often. Its just reassuring to know what others do so Im not compramising their health!!:)
     
  8. kozykatz

    kozykatz PetForums VIP

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    Yearly boosters really aren't necessary, especially for indoor cats. I'd suggest asking your vet about this - it's well known that the enteritis vaccine protects for at least 7 years and probably longer, in fact some vaccine manufacturers are only recommending boosters every 2 years now. The flu vaccines probably don't last as long, but a healthy adult cat that does not come into contact with other cats, is not going to be at much risk.

    My cats are only boosted once per 15-18 months now - my vet is happy with this. They are all indoors, but as I'm a breeder, and some of my cats go to shows, i don't want to stop vaccinating completely.
     
  9. flossy14

    flossy14 PetForums Newbie

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    Thankyou everyone....been to the vet for the booster jabs this afternoon, and she was very honest. Told me to not worry about doing flea treatment in the winter months, and only once in summer as the hot weather is perfect for fleas to breed. Worm treatments can be done every 6 months, and the jabs can now be done every 2 years as they are indoor cats. If I had not had the advice from all who replied I would not have asked! Happy days...:D
     
  10. kozykatz

    kozykatz PetForums VIP

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    well done for asking and good on your vet for not insisting on yearly boosters - all they do is boost vets' wallets :rolleyes5:

    I never use flea treatments unless I see fleas - which has been only twice in the last 10 years or so - and I don't worm my indoor cats as they have never shown any evidence of worms. I do worm my kittens though - once, before they leave home, with Profender (spot on treatment). Of course they have never shown any evidence of worms either, but it's unfair on the new owners not to do it. In general I prefer not to dose my cats with uneccessary medications, i've heard far too many bad things about oral wormers given to kittens not to mention nasty reactions to flea medications.




     
  11. Coraline

    Coraline PetForums Member

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    I seem to be the odd one out here, because..

    1. I don't worm regularly. I feed my cat a raw diet, which means he's in excellent health and his immune system is great and able to withstand a worm infestation. However, I do take a fecal sample the vet for his yearly checkup so it can be tested for worms. Also, if he was to show symptoms I would do a fecal sample to confirm first, and then worm.

    2. I don't vaccinate. He's had his initial vaccinations while he was with the breeder. Personally I don't think he needs anything further, and I am more afraid of complications of the repeated vaccines than I am of him catching a bug. He doesn't meet any other cats or animals so the risk of contracting anything is minimal.

    3. I don't do flea treatments regularly. Same as for worming, really. Checked once a year by the vet, and if he shows symptoms I will get it confirmed and then treated.

    I'm not trying to stop anyone from vaccinating! Just wanted to add a different opinion to this thread :)
     
  12. Saynamore

    Saynamore Banned

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    I dont treat for fleas at all unless I am going to a show. I have far too many cats to do so, and none go outside, so unless they come into the house on myself they dont get them. If I do need to treat at all I use Stronghold as it does earmites as well ;):D:D
     
  13. nortons

    nortons PetForums Junior

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    i do not vaccinate mine but i do worm her,and my cat always wear a flea collar.the reason why is even though she is a indoor cat.
     
  14. ColeosMummy

    ColeosMummy PetForums VIP

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    i flea and worm my two indoor cats i dont update vacs am i a bad mummy :( *cries*
     
  15. Catbox4

    Catbox4 PetForums Newbie

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    I have done quite a bit of research on this topic, and have decided to vaccinate only every 5 years or so. This is for a few reasons, and every situation is different.
    I have 4 indoor only cats, all of which are 6 years old, and older. Younger cats are more susceptible to infection and disease, just like young children. So, it is wise to vaccinate regularly until 2 or 3 years old. After that, there is little evidence to show that indoor cats are particularly vulnerable to these diseases, or that the vaccinations are sufficiently effective to warrant constant vaccination. More so, there have been multiple reported cases of "vaccine induced sarcoma" - a cancer at the site of injection. Many people have lost their pets, due to these tumors and related complications. Not to mention the unnecessary expense, AND the fact that there are studies that show the effects of these vaccinations last far beyond one, even 3 years !
    I was vaccinating yearly, until I ran across a vet who told me that every 3 years was plenty !
    However, you should consider your personal situation, and level of comfort. If your cats are exposed to the outdoors, other cats or animals - or any other outside influence - vaccinations should def. be considered important. Also, many people feel that they would rather feel "safe than sorry" - although I view that in the opposite way.
    Do some internet research - that way you can draw your own conclusions. :D
     
  16. minibluff

    minibluff PetForums Newbie

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    Sorry to resurrect an old thread, but I found this doing a Google search and would like to add to it.

    Most importantly if you are thinking of not vaccinating your cats every year just make sure it doesn't void your pet insurance. I have 2 cats that only go out every now and again and never venture out of our garden. I made a decision to give up on pet insurance as all my claims never seemed to be upheld because it was a previous condition "yadayada" and I haven't vaccinated them for a few years. The result is obvious I have saved myself over £1000 on pet bills. One of my cats is not very well at the moment so for the first time in years I have to take him to the vet this afternoon and if it does cost me £500 i am still in pocket. As you can tell my reason for not vaccinating is purely money orientated. If I was loaded I would be getting my cats vaccinated every year.
     
  17. mardatha

    mardatha PetForums Junior

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    This is a very interesting thread, just what I needed as I was wondering the same thing. Lots of different views here too, which is great.
     
  18. ForeverHome

    ForeverHome PetForums VIP

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    I didn't even check the date lol but I'm adding my voice to the nays. I have two indoors who don't get none of those (well they won't after Molly has had her first 12 month booster in August). I also still have two who go out who live with my ex and they are also not f&w'd except when her allergy flares up every couple of years. Then I buy a 3 pack, they get one each, she gets the 3rd as her second dose, and that's job done.
     
  19. Shoshannah

    Shoshannah Feline Medicine Nerd

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    Lol, double negative! :lol:


    My personal take on preventative care of indoor cats (and it's just my opinion, probably the furthest thing from gospel there is :D):
    - vaccinate against cat 'flu, but not feline leukaemia. How often? Tough one. I would say every three years - but always get the two kitten vaccines and first year booster done first.
    - flea treatment - I probably wouldn't bother. IMO there is no point in giving a spot-on as a one-off preventative. It will only last 4-8 weeks (dependent on brand), thus leaving you with 44-48 weeks unprotected - treat religiously or not at all is my motto (always the former if your cat has FAD).
    - worming - probably not necessary in indoor cats. Maybe 1-2 times per year, especially if the cat is fed a raw diet.
    - health checks - annual, especially in cats aged eight or over.
     
  20. ForeverHome

    ForeverHome PetForums VIP

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    Bah how did I let that slip??

    When I took Molly for her booster my vet said we had to start again because we didn't know what brand was used, which irritated me but I can accept. But I think that rules them out for being willing to give a booster after 2 or 3 years. I am coming to the conclusion all the vets in my area are all pants :(
     
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