13 week old Rottweiler puppy - 2 nasty bites.

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by sjallen88, Mar 7, 2013.


  1. Meezey

    Meezey Slave to the Black & Tans and the Trundle Bugs.

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    Rott's do need all of the above your correct BUT force is never a way to train a dog, any breed, "flooring" a dog is not a way I consider training, yep plenty of different training methods out there many of them out dated!!
     
  2. newfiesmum

    newfiesmum Moderator
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    But you still haven't explained what you mean by "flooring".
     
  3. Phoolf

    Phoolf PetForums VIP

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    I take it you 'floor' your child [if you have any] for misbehaving then :confused: That's what you do to 'loved family members' after all
     
  4. Malmum

    Malmum PetForums VIP

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    Sorry if I misunderstood and it WASN'T you who said you 'floored your dog'. Only commenting on what was written, can't see what's wrong in that! We're still none the wiser in what that statement actually meant though!

    ETA - if your dog is quite the angel now why do you have to 'floor' him at all? Could it be because your methods don't actually work? Just curious.

    BTW 'flooring', if we all assume correctly, is just the same as hitting - it's still physical abuse however you choose to word it'
     
    #44 Malmum, Mar 16, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2013
  5. trawlerskipper

    trawlerskipper PetForums Newbie

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    The point i was making was that if she was going to take her dog to Billericay they use the flooring method as a way of telling the dog off ( for want of a better word ) and she should make sure she is comfortable with this method.
    As a new owner i knew no other way but bowed to the greater knowledge of the trainers there and breeders. ( how else are we to choose ).
    I HAVE not had to floor my dog for over a year!!!
    Now as for force i used, its as much as i use to roll him over to brush him.
    You all assumed i hit him??? why? did i say that NO.
    I will listen to anyone who is a qualified trainer or behaviourist and can substantiate better training methods or say why we should not copy the dogs parents behaviour.
    Everyone is entitled to an opinion and even CESAR MILLAN has his critics ( he uses the submissive method ) so how are us mere mortals meant to know who's right?.
     
  6. ouesi

    ouesi Wag More Bark Less

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    Anyone who is a *qualified* behaviorist will tell you that "flooring," the submissive method, and CM type methods are all unnecessary and detrimental.

    Oh, and dogs don't do that to each other either. The dog being reprimanded OFFERS the belly up position, it is never forced by the other dog. If it is, you get a gnarly dog FIGHT on your hands. ;)
     
  7. newfiesmum

    newfiesmum Moderator
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    Well, I have never had to floor my dog, nor any other dog I have ever owned for that matter. You still have not explained what you mean by that, so I can only assume you mean the "alpha roll", an expression bandied about rather liberally by the idiotic, bullying Cesar Millan, who knows sweet FA about dogs.

    Saying "even" Cesar Millan is rather unfortunate, since most on here are his critics and he is just as much a mere mortal as everybody else, just a richer one.

    No human can copy what dogs do to one another, because we have usually observed it all wrong anyway. As said, a dog will offer a submissive posture, it is never forced upon it by another dog. Humans like to think that it is forced because it is what they would do.
     
  8. sjallen88

    sjallen88 PetForums Junior

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    @ Chichi - he is left for a maximum of 2-3 hours as we are staggering our hours at work so he isnt left to long and when we cant do that, my mum and dad come round to play with him and take him on a walk. When left he has a couple of kongs normally filled with peanut butter/chicken/ham etc. He seems to be fine when we come back and hasnt soiled his crate and normally is just asleep curled up with his teddy.

    He is fine eating from our hands and doesn't touch skin with his teeth, and his guarding is getting better, he is still not very happy when we try and take a bone away but we just do a simple swap for it and he is fine.

    As for being from a good breeder and having bite inhibition, we chose the best breeder we had seen in around 6 months and know that they are well known in the Rottweiler scene from showing & breeding so we can did what we could and asked all the questions regarding how they raised the puppies.

    Thanks for the continued advice though everyone
     
  9. Rotty Guy

    Rotty Guy PetForums Newbie

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    Hello all, it's a pleasure to be part of the site. I have been working. Rottweilers and GSD for 3 decades.
    As others have mentioned, early boundaries with this Breed is critical.
    When the Rott is young it's a must that you socialize them with everything. Kids, other animals, adults etc. The more exposure the better. Rotties when properly socialized at a young age will be the best hound you can ever have. Remember they are not a poodle, they are a high stung dominant dog that needs to be socialized.
    When they are young they need to be taught bite control. They will show affection by puppy biting buy you need to teach them bite control.
    Verbal communication is level 1. Because this breed is high strung you may have to esculate the correction with a "pinning technique" after a loud verbal command you gentily roll them on their back and gentiy pin them and let them know who is the boss. This must be done at an early age so they know where they stand in the pack. Bottom line they are the bottom of the pack in your household. You, spouse, children must be above him. They are smart and will figure it out.
    Food aggression is a very simple fix at a young age. While the pup is snacking on a bone or eating, very carefully introduce your hand (with a nice small treat). Do not reach in immediately, simply get your hand close with the treat and watch him strart to nudge your hand wanting the treat inside. Gradually work your way to hand feeding them and after a short time they will no longer be food aggressive and know hands are not a threat.
    Once you build that trust it is very important to pet them head to toe, paws etc while they are eating so they don't become skittish when eating. Again, Rott training must be done as early as possible. If you hit the mark, you will cherish this dog.
     
  10. ouesi

    ouesi Wag More Bark Less

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    Hi @Rotty Guy welcome to PF :)
    This thread is from 3 years ago - ancient in forum years. The OP has not been back but hopefully the resource guarding issue has been sorted with the good advice already offered.

    Pinning dogs, putting them on their back, showing dominance etc. is also very old - as in old school dog training. The Monks of New Skeete themselves have recanted this technique and no one who is up to date with the most effective techniques does this anymore.

    Perhaps have a read around the forum, the dog training and behavior part especially, old school methods are not very popular on here. :) Just a heads up...
     
  11. newfiesmum

    newfiesmum Moderator
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    You are really not saying anything that doesn't apply to any breed. What we don't do on this forum is encourage pack leader mentality. Humans do not form packs and a dog knows he's not human. Food aggression is a simple fix at any age; my newfie bitch was 3 1/2 when she came to me and was used to sharing the food area with seven other dogs. She was a guarder, but easily fixed with watchfulness and keeping the dogs separate during mealtimes. I've never believed in interfering with a dog's food; that causes food guarding. It makes no difference what breed it is and why you should think a poodle is more accommodating, I don't know. Poodles are originally working dogs, just like rotties.
     
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  12. Muttly

    Muttly Fluffy Mutts Rule!

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    I find it shocking that 30 year veterans IN the industry still believe this crap :(
     
  13. ouesi

    ouesi Wag More Bark Less

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    Not shocking unfortunately.
    Just because someone has been in the industry for 30 years, doesn’t mean that they have stayed up to date, learned new techniques, or grown at all.
    There are many people in all areas who learn something a certain way and do the same thing for decades.
     
  14. Muttly

    Muttly Fluffy Mutts Rule!

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    Yeah, I suppose I shouldn't be surprised, look at CM. :rolleyes:
     
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  15. ouesi

    ouesi Wag More Bark Less

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    Shshshshshshs! Don’t say that name out loud!!
     
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  16. Muttly

    Muttly Fluffy Mutts Rule!

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    :Muted Is it like Candyman :eek:
     
  17. ouesi

    ouesi Wag More Bark Less

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    or Voldemort. Don’t want any dementors to appear....
     
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  18. rottiepointerhouse

    rottiepointerhouse PetForums VIP

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    Hello. I too have owned Rottweilers and GSD's for 3 decades - 4 now (although not a GSD since the 80's). I've owned males and females, pups from breeders, adults from rescue and a pup from rescue too. I have NEVER had to roll them on their back and pin them to let them know who is boss, I have NEVER felt it necessary to let them know where they stand in the pack or be above them. I've also NEVER found it necessary or desirable to pet them head to toe while they are eating - WTF is that about? Add food to their bowls so they are not suspicious of hands coming near - if you tried to pet me when I was tucking into my dinner I would probably stick the fork in your hand to teach you a lesson in manners. So as others have said Rotts need basic socialisation and training and manners just like any other breed of dog.
     
  19. newfiesmum

    newfiesmum Moderator
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    It seems to me that people who want to pin down their dogs, show them who's boss and stick their own grubby mitts into their food, are looking for ways in which to make an enemy of that dog. If anyone did all those things to me, I'm sure I wouldn't look up to them as my leader. I would be looking for any way I could find to challenge them. This is why so many dogs end up in rescue because they have proved untrustworthy to the family, a family who have been listening to this rubbish and watching the one whose name we won't mention.

    I've had dogs for 36 years and they've always been my friends and did what I wanted because they wanted to please me, not because they thought I was the boss.