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  #1  
Old 21-02-2010, 01:10 PM
Nellybelly Nellybelly is offline
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Thick discharge

yes it's me...again...with yet ANOTHER hear related worry.
Bella has been in standing heat since monday. her discharge became clear pinkish to straw coloured and almost stoppped the past couple of days.
Today, as she was lying on her side I noticed some thick yellowy pink discharge at the base of her vulva. I wiped it off with a tissue, but it was definitely not runny like her discharge has been to date. She is feeling fine in herself, albeit fed up of lack of normal walks etc, but she is not lethargic or anything.
Is it normal for discharge to have this consistency?
Also, she only flags in one direction today, i.e. only reacts when one side of the base of her tail is stimulated....could this have anything to do with the changing consistency of the discharge?
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  #2  
Old 21-02-2010, 01:50 PM
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pickle pickle is offline
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Re: Thick discharge

Be vigilant for a condition called Pyometra (not trying to worry you).

Pyometra
Canine pyometra is an infection in the dogs uterus that may require

Jul 23, 2006 Charla Dawson
Pyometra is a uterine infection where the uterus fills with pus. Pyometra is common in unspayed dogs.

Pyometra is a serious uterine infection that is potentially fatal and can occur in unspayed animals. During the animal's heat cycle, or estrus cycle, her cervix relaxes and opens a little, this can allow bacteria to enter her uterus. When the cervix closes the bacteria is trapped.

The body is usually able to fight off infections but if the immune system is somehow compromised then a pyometra can develop. The bacteria usually seen in pyometra is E. Coli although other bacterias have been to blame. Usually dogs and cats presented with pyometras are middle aged to older and within 60 days of their last heat cycle.

Symptoms of Pyometra: Pyometras can present as either open or closed. In the open form the cervix is open and there is a foul smelling discharge from the vagina. In the closed form the cervix is closed so there will be no discharge. The closed pyometra is harder to diagnose and the patient is usually sicker because the body is retaining the infection in the uterus.

Symptoms of pyometra include, but are not limited to: very smelly vaginal discharge, enlarged abdomen because of the uterus filling with pus, vomiting, not eating, lethargy, drinking more, urinating more, and dehydration.

Treatment of Pyometra: If your pet is exhibiting any of these symptoms, take her to the veterinarian immediately. Your veterinarian will probably want to run blood work and do an x-ray of the abdomen. The blood work will show the doctor how well the organs are functioning and how bad the infection is.

Read more at Suite101: Pyometra: Canine pyometra is an infection in the dogs uterus that may require Pyometra: Canine pyometra is an infection in the dogs uterus that may require
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Old 21-02-2010, 01:53 PM
Nellybelly Nellybelly is offline
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Re: Thick discharge

Quote:
Originally Posted by pickle View Post
Be vigilant for a condition called Pyometra (not trying to worry you).

Pyometra
Canine pyometra is an infection in the dogs uterus that may require

Jul 23, 2006 Charla Dawson
Pyometra is a uterine infection where the uterus fills with pus. Pyometra is common in unspayed dogs.

Pyometra is a serious uterine infection that is potentially fatal and can occur in unspayed animals. During the animal's heat cycle, or estrus cycle, her cervix relaxes and opens a little, this can allow bacteria to enter her uterus. When the cervix closes the bacteria is trapped.

The body is usually able to fight off infections but if the immune system is somehow compromised then a pyometra can develop. The bacteria usually seen in pyometra is E. Coli although other bacterias have been to blame. Usually dogs and cats presented with pyometras are middle aged to older and within 60 days of their last heat cycle.

Symptoms of Pyometra: Pyometras can present as either open or closed. In the open form the cervix is open and there is a foul smelling discharge from the vagina. In the closed form the cervix is closed so there will be no discharge. The closed pyometra is harder to diagnose and the patient is usually sicker because the body is retaining the infection in the uterus.

Symptoms of pyometra include, but are not limited to: very smelly vaginal discharge, enlarged abdomen because of the uterus filling with pus, vomiting, not eating, lethargy, drinking more, urinating more, and dehydration.

Treatment of Pyometra: If your pet is exhibiting any of these symptoms, take her to the veterinarian immediately. Your veterinarian will probably want to run blood work and do an x-ray of the abdomen. The blood work will show the doctor how well the organs are functioning and how bad the infection is.

Read more at Suite101: Pyometra: Canine pyometra is an infection in the dogs uterus that may require Pyometra: Canine pyometra is an infection in the dogs uterus that may require
Thanks for replying. this has definintely crossed my mind, but as she is not finished with her season yet, I dont think it can happen just yet.
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Old 21-02-2010, 01:55 PM
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Re: Thick discharge

Good, sorry I realise you are a worrier and so can I be.
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Old 21-02-2010, 01:56 PM
Nellybelly Nellybelly is offline
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Re: Thick discharge

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Originally Posted by pickle View Post
Good, sorry I realise you are a worrier and so can I be.
Me? worry?? hahahahahah. Yes spot on, in factan understatement!
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Old 21-02-2010, 01:58 PM
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Re: Thick discharge

I know how it is. I have friends who are so calm and laid back and I so envy them!
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Old 21-02-2010, 02:03 PM
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Re: Thick discharge

I think its nothing to worry about personally unless it goes a dark colour and smells,?

I doubt very much it is pyro.
Pyometra is a disease mainly of middle-aged female dogs that have not been spayed. In the past, we thought pyometra was simply a uterine infection, but today, we know that it is a hormonal abnormality, and a secondary bacterial infection may or may not be present. Pyometra follows a heat cycle in which fertilization did not occur. Typically, within two to four months after the cycle, the female starts showing signs of the disease.

What causes pyometra?

The two main hormones produced by the ovaries are estrogen and progesterone. An excessive quantity of progesterone, or the uterus becoming oversensitive to it, causes pyometra. In either case, cysts form in the lining of the uterus. These cysts contain numerous secretory cells, and large quantities of fluids are produced and released into the interior of the uterus.

This fluid, along with a thickening of the walls of the uterus, brings about a dramatic increase in the overall size of this organ. The uterus is made up of a body with two horns. In the unaffected dog or cat, the horns are smaller than a common pencil. However, in cases of pyometra, they become large, sac-like pouches the circumference of cucumbers and 12 to 18 inches long. Normally, the entire uterus in a 40-pound dog will weigh two to four ounces, but in cases of pyometra, this typically ranges from one to four pounds.

As the disease continues, fluid spills out of the vagina causing the animal to lick this area in an attempt to keep itself clean. Bacteria commonly colonize the uterus by entering through the cervix. This produces an even greater response by the body, as it showers additional fluid and white blood cells into the affected organ.

After a while, the cervix closes. This effectively traps all of the fluid within the uterus. Still, the body continues to transfer more fluid and white blood cells into the organ, causing even further dilatation and growth. The uterus can rupture, spilling its contents into the abdominal cavity. If this occurs, the dog or cat usually dies in less than 48 hours. In most cases, this does not happen.

The body will attempt to eliminate the problem by carrying the wastes and excess fluid through the bloodstream to the kidneys. However, the amount of material in a dog with pyometra is too great to be eliminated in this fashion, overloading the kidney system. The normal toxins that should be excreted from the body build up, and the animal goes into uremic poisoning. Untreated, she will die from kidney failure.

Mo
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Old 21-02-2010, 02:06 PM
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Re: Thick discharge

I only said be vigilant.
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